Money Mastery Series: Developing a Positive Mindset about Money

Jul 11, 2019 | Sheila Hill


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Your relationship with money can either make you feel financially secure, or heavy and fearful. Intuitive Life Coach, Sheila Hill, shares how money relationships are formed, how they affect your feelings about your finances, and how changing your min

Your relationship with money can either make you feel financially secure, or heavy and fearful. Intuitive Life Coach, Sheila Hill, shares how money relationships are formed, how they affect your feelings about your finances, and how changing your mindset can make a difference in your financial life.

 

Your past relationship with money doesn’t have to be your future. By exploring the state of your current relationship with money & understanding how you got to where you are, you can change how you think, feel and behave toward money — and may even shift how money affects your overall well-being.

 

In this Money Mastery Series, Intuitive Life Coach and spiritual guide Sheila Hill shares how changing your money story may improve your relationship with money, and help you shift your mindset from one of lack and scarcity to one of security and abundance.

 

Q: Why is it important to consider the relationship we have with our money?

 

Hill: We nurture many relationships throughout our lives: Those with our kids, our friends, family members, even coworkers. We know that what we nurture, grows. Nurturing and understanding your relationship with money can be just as important.

 

I like to ask people: Is it a whirl-wind romance, filled with respect, balance and flow? Or is it a love-hate relationship?

Whatever it is, I feel it’s important for people to think about how they ended up in the relationship they currently have with money.

 

Q: What factors influence a person’s relationship with money?

 

Hill: A large part of how many people think about money can be answered by reflecting back on their childhood and the values, thoughts and beliefs that were instilled within them regarding money.

Was money considered a limited resource? Was it something that made your family feel disempowered and lacking control? Perhaps it wasn’t discussed at all.

 

Growing up, many people might have heard these phrases:

“We can’t afford that.”

“Money doesn’t grow on trees.”

“You spend everything you get.”

“Money is the root of all evil.”

“Money is to be saved not spent.”

 

Our childhood experiences greatly affect who we become, and our relationship with money is no different. For example, many people in their 40’s or 50’s were brought up by parents who were born and raised following the war — a time when many families experienced scarcity and loss. These people may have absorbed their parents’ money story about ‘lack & scarcity’ and taken it on as their own.

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