Bottlenecks

Oct 19, 2021 | Mark Ryan


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Go Boldly

 

This week, the man best known as Captain James T. Kirk joined a small crew and boldly went to the sky inside a really and truly spaceship. The privately built, New Shepard spacecraft took the 90 year old William Shatner AKA “Geezer-pants,” over 100 kilometers high. That’s like tipping the road from PG to Vanderhoof straight up, but with no cowboys at the other end. And here we must mention that the good man is not only Canadian, but the oldest person to fly into space, and the first we know of to do so wearing adult diapers. And when I think about this, and that unfortunate last name, it makes me a little bit uncomfortable -- but this is a family email. Then again, Shatner and co. only flew to about half the altitude that Alan Shepard reached in the first U.S. “spaceflight” 60 years ago.

 

So the Chart Geek was in Overdrive This Week:

 

This first one looks like bats hanging inside a cave. It shows the impact of bats (Covid) on restaurant sitters down.

 

 

This one is a temperature map on attitudes toward the vaccines.

 

 

 

 

This next one is a temperature map of where low interest rates are coming from, by geography and sector.

 

 

 

 

This last one shows that when you give people money for nothing, they might now go to work.

 

 

 

 

Global Insights:

 

Supply chain shortcomings – Problems with supply chains have become a greater source of concern and are underpinning inflation pressures. There is no quick way to relieve the bottlenecks. We examine the root causes, and discuss the impact on the equity market.

 

U.S. default worries deferred as inflation concerns mount – The U.S. passed a temporary legislative fix for the debt ceiling limit as the bond market focus shifts to inflation and the possible impact of rising prices, and to the Fed policy response on short- and long-term interest rates.

 

Regional highlights: Canada’s labour market recovery stretched into September. Brexit not done: UK-EU tensions flare on the Irish border. China’s Producer Price Index has biggest monthly jump since 1995.

 

If you’re still awake, (or don’t want to be) read more here:  Global Insight Weekly

 

Enjoy your weekend ! 

 

Mark